Category Archives: blog

All you need to know about Rotator Cuff Tears

By  david@ogrelogic.com  published  September 26, 2018

Rotator Cuff

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons around the shoulder joint. They keep the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) secure in the shoulder socket. A shoulder injury can affect the rotator cuff, causing a dull ache in the shoulder, which may worsen when sleep on the affected side.

Rotator Cuff Tears

A rotator cuff tear is a common injury, in sports such as baseball, or in jobs such as cleaning windows. It can occur due to age-related wear and tear or overuse and repetitive motions. Your rotator cuff may also get injured if you fall on your arm or lift something heavy.

A rotator cuff tears can be partial (when the tendon is frayed) or complete (the tendon is pulled off the bone).

Rotator Cuff Tear Symptoms

A rotator cuff tear may present as –

  • trouble raising your arm
  • pain with certain arm movements
  • pain when you lie on the affected side
  • weakness in the shoulder
  • inability to lift things
  • clicking or popping sounds with arm movement

Left untreated, a torn rotator cuff can lead to a frozen shoulder or arthritis which is harder to treat.

Treatment for Rotator Cuff Tears

The orthopedic doctor would initially recommend –

  • physical therapy to strengthen shoulder muscles stronger
  • anti-inflammatory drugs to help with pain and swelling

Surgery may be required in some cases, especially if you have a complete tear. Surgery can be done to stitch together the torn area or reattach the tendon to the bone.

There are three types of rotator cuff surgery:

  • Arthroscopic or minimally invasive surgery
  • Open surgery
  • Mini-Open surgery that uses both arthroscopic and open methods
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Comminuted Fractured Treatment – How is it Beneficial to Patients?

By  aenriquez  published  September 13, 2018

Are you clumsy?  Do you easily fall or break bones? Getting older and your bones seem to be brittle?  Middle of the night, hospital visits are your norm?  Typically, we would relate this to the elderly or those with brittle bone (osteoporosis), but it can happen to anyone.

I can honestly say, I have never fractured anything or had to seek long-term treatment for bothersome ailments.  Tons of Americans want quick fixes and to feel pain-free immediately.  I prefer the proper care and treatment for safer longevity and stability.

Every bone in our body has the potential to be broken, fractured or dislocated.  There is a treatment that trained doctor’s use and you must do so very carefully and wisely.

Comminuted Fracture Treatment is much more complicated than normal fracture breaks because bones are severed in three or more fragments.  Communized fractures are put under a lot of pressure and eventually end up being severed in several places.  Surgery is usually imminent.  Risks could impose major complications and treatment tends to be tricky.  Surgeons need to rehabilitate every broken piece of bone and will use screws or specially made cement to fuse pieces together.  If the bones do not require a surgical procedure – readjustment might be possible.

Comminuted Fracture Home Solutions:

Get proper rest and try to keep the pained area stable, elevated and free of movement until it is healed. Your goal should be to regain strength and get back to normal.

Prescribed Pain Medication will be needed in some cases as deemed necessary, but not expected.  Often pain is unbearable, and a script is needed for soreness, throbbing sensations, and agony (at times). Caution getting addicted to pain medications, overusing them, and having to up your dose for pain relief.

Why do Comminuted Fractures occur?

Accidents cause most of the fractures that specialists see.  There must be a great amount of pressure such as experiencing a massive car crash or gunshot wound.

Individuals with Osteoporosis (weak bones) or cancer can fracture body parts easily in several various places. As adults get older, bones deteriorate and the decline in strength makes a quick fall traumatic.

Athletes occur in people who play more than one sport (typically) as this increases their risk of injury.

FXRX https://www.fxrxinc.com/ employ’s topnotch orthopedic surgeons that are highly trained for all extremities including:

◻Hip, Femur, Knee and Let Fractures

◻Hip Fractures, Distal Femur (Thighbone) Fractures of the knee

◻Femur Shaft Fractures (Broken Thighbone)

◻Fractures of the Proximal Tibia

◻Foot and Ankle Fractures

◻Upper Extremity Fractures

Therapy and treatment guides us through significant changes that eventually improves our lives in new miraculous ways.  I believe our staff to be the best in the industry and work tirelessly to put you back together, one piece at a time!

“Change, like healing, takes time.”  — Veronica Roth, Allegiant

 

 

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Knee Treatment – You Have Many Options to Heal

By  aenriquez  published  September 5, 2018

Living with pain is not an option many are willing to tolerate, especially when life becomes unbearable and debilitating.

There are many treatment options that are available to our patients, highly effective and will get you on the road to recovery, quickly.

Knee pain is very common and treatable.  It is easy to diagnose why you have pain, but it takes a skilled physician to determine which treatments are best for healing.

Knee injuries occur in people who are athletic, play sports, have degenerative arthritis, osteoporosis, or a shocking life event (like a car accident).

Knee Arthroscopy (Knee Scope): Minimally invasive surgical procedure, where a highly trained surgeon will shave soft tissue or repair and reconstruct ligaments and cartilage.

Meniscectomy: most commonly used with a knee scope, where torn cartilage in the knee is shaved to alleviate knee pain.

Partial and Total Knee Replacement: one of the most successful orthopedic surgical procedures in treating your damaged knee, due to post-traumatic arthritis or inflammation.  Partial knee replacement is beneficial to those patients who need only one part of the injured knee replaced.

Cartilage Regeneration: cushions the knee to allow for painless mobility. 

Articular Chondrocyte Implantation: biopsy is taken to evaluate the cartilage in the knee, arthroscopic surgery is then performed to implant cartilage into the defect to heal.

Osteo Transfer Surgery: cartilage from a healthy area is taken and is moved to the damaged area in the knee.

Microfracture Procedure: an arthroscopy procedure used to stimulate new cartilage growth.  If you cannot actively participate in sporting events, athletics (such as weight lifting or running) due to pain, then we recommend giving this treatment a try.  We warn all patients that this procedure may not last long term.

DeNovo Natural Tissue Graft: used in the specific treatment of articular cartilage defect.  This is one of our newest methods of rejuvenation and healing, where a donor’s juvenile cartilage is used.  An outpatient procedure where donor tissue gets inserted into the defected area and molded with fibrin glue.

 

Orthopedic Bracing (Orthosis): is a medical device, with various functionalities.  Sometimes it is used to reshape the body or hinder any mobility of a specified part of the body.  The orthopedic brace is also used to take the weight off the injured area. 

Steroid Injections: injecting medication into your knee will remove negative symptoms.  The drugs work through your joints ( pained area) and work immediately.  Inflammation tends to decrease within 24-48 hours but used for short-term relief only.

At FXRX https://www.fxrxinc.com/kneesurgery.html

We offer the utmost quality care, with trusted experts, who want to see you 100% healed and healthy.

We will find where the pain is located and take actionable steps in correcting it.  Let us help you find the right treatment solution, for your specific injury.

“The natural healing force in each of us is the greatest force in getting well.”  — Hippocrates

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Are you suffering from a Tennis Elbow?

By  david@ogrelogic.com  published  August 24, 2018

If you were surprised at your Tennis elbow diagnosis or think that it happens only to Tennis players, this isn’t always the case. While Tennis elbow is certainly common among tennis players, it is essentially an overuse injury.

Tennis elbow is often the result of activities that use the same muscle group, such as gardening, painting, even using a screwdriver and of course, playing tennis.

Tennis elbow is characterized by soreness or pain on the outer side of the elbow. It occurs when the tendons connecting the muscles of the forearm to the elbow are injured or damaged. The pain may also radiate from the arm to the wrist. Left untreated, the injury may even cause pain when you are doing simple things like turning a key. Tennis elbow is formally referred to as ‘lateral epicondylitis’.

To diagnose tennis elbow, the doctor will examine your elbow and ask questions about the level of pain, any injuries and your daily activities. A diagnostic imaging test, such as MRI or X-ray, may be done. Once a diagnosis is made, your doctor would design a treatment plan for your condition or injury.

The first line of treatment is often anti-inflammatory medication and physical therapy. However, if your pain doesn’t ease with conservative treatment, the doctor may prescribe surgery followed by rehabilitation. You can return to activity gradually, as advised by your doctor.

 

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Urgent Signs You Should See an Orthopedic Surgeon

By  admin6  published  July 23, 2018

Millions of Americans suffer from some type of musculoskeletal pain. While sometimes acute pain would resolve on its own, chronic, persistent pain can heavily impact your quality of life. So, the question is when you should seek the expert opinion of an orthopedic surgeon if you are suffering from pain.

Generally, persistent pain requires immediate attention rather than waiting for it to go way by itself. In fact, ignoring pain or an injury may even make it worse or lead to new problems. For example, toughing out an ankle sprain can cause problems in your knees and hips.

To know when the pain warrants medical attention, observe your body. Keep an eye on your level of your pain and how long it has been there.

Soft tissue injuries, such as twisting a knee during a run, may respond to the RICE method – Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation. But, if the pain hasn’t reduced after 2 days, you should consult an orthopedic doctor. The same is true for osteoarthritis patients.

If your pain prevents you from participating in activities you once enjoyed, such as gardening or playing with your grandchildren, it may be a sign that you need orthopedic care.

If you experience stiffness in your joints, wobbliness, or a lack of balance, it could be the result of an injury or osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease. It is time to talk to an orthopedic specialist.

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Managing and Restoring Mobility of a Broken Arm

By  aenriquez  published  July 5, 2018

A broken arm is a painful and unfortunate event in a patient’s life. But after that initial pain subsides, one can often be left wondering will I ever get back to normal? Will my movement be affected by the broken arm? Will I be able to work? Can I go back to playing sport? Of course, the answers to these questions is incredibly variable depending on what you have broken and how badly it has been broken.

What can you break in the arm?

A number of structures make up an “arm” and can this be broken. The arm is defined as everything between the wrist and the shoulder and includes a number of bony structures. These are:

  • The humerus bone is attached into your shoulder socket and goes all the way down to your elbow.
  • The forearm goes from the wrist to the elbow and has two bones, the radius, and the ulna. The radius is the bone you can feel on the side of your thumb, whilst the ulnar is underneath it and on the side of your little finger.

All of these structures can of course break, and break in different ways and at different points. Each individual fracture has its own specific management based on years of research.

All of these structures can of course break, and break in different ways and at different points

How do you manage a broken arm?

Whilst all break will be dealt with differently, there are some general principles that get people back to normal after a broken arm. Firstly, the break needs to heal. If the two ends of the broken bone line up perfectly and look like they will heal well then usually a sling will suffice to take the weight off the patient’s arm and ensure they are pain-free. However, in some breaks, the two bones are not properly lined up and need to be “reduced”. This can be done by pulling the bones back into position (don’t worry – anesthetic is provided) and putting a cast or splint on them to keep them in position. In some cases, surgery may be needed to fix the fracture into position.

Once this initial management has been completed the patient usually has a period of immobility where they cannot move the affected arm before rehabilitation starts. The rehab process will be specific to the break but usually involves devices to support the arm and physiotherapy to rehabilitate movement of the joints around the break. The specific exercises practiced in the physiotherapy will be determined by where the bone is broken.

If you or somebody you know has been affected by a broken arm, they may need specialist help to adequately rehabilitate mobility in their broken arm. To get specialist advice and treatment for this get in contact with a clinic providing orthopedic and physiotherapy services in the United States. It seems trivial but ensuring proper rehabilitation is often the most important part of the management of a broken arm and when done properly can allow the individual to return to work sooner with less pain and more mobility.

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Implications Of An Untreated Stress Fracture

By  aenriquez  published  June 26, 2018

If you have pain in a bone that is unrelenting and associated with exercise or work then you might have suffered a stress fracture. These injuries seem innocent enough but can have significant implications if left alone and not looked at by a professional.

What is a stress fracture?

A fracture (as many of us will know) is a broken bone. A complete fracture splits the bone into two or more pieces whilst a partial fracture doesn’t. However, a stress fracture is a broken bone caused by repetitive and repeated compressive stresses to it. It can occur from a small number of high load repeated stresses and a high number of low load stresses (ie a marine with a heavy backpack running for a few miles versus a distance runner pounding the pavement for over 100 miles a week).

What happens if you leave it untreated?

This all depends on where the fracture is and whether it is in a high or low-risk site. In the worst case scenario, the stress fracture can develop into a full fracture causing displacement of the bone, nonunion (where the bone doesn’t heal properly) or fracture propagation (where the fracture becomes bigger and bigger). These complications are likely to occur at high-risk sites. High-risk sites for a stress fracture include:

  • Any stress fractures in the spine but particular the region of the lumbar spine known as the pars interarticularis
  • Hip and thigh fractures in the femoral head
  • Knee and leg fractures of the patella or the tibia
  • Ankle and foot fractures in the:
    • Medial malleolus
    • Talus
    • Tarsal navicular
    • Base of second metatarsal

A fracture (as many of us will know) is a broken bone

Some sites have a low risk of complication and these include:

  • Second and fourth metatarsal shafts (bones in the feet)
  • Posteromedial tibial shaft (part of the lower leg bone)
  • Proximal Humerus
  • Humeral shaft (arm)
  • Ribs
  • Sacrum (bottom of the spine)

How should it be managed?

If you or somebody you know suspects you might be suffering from a stress fracture then get in contact with a specialist orthopedic clinic immediately for evaluation. They will assess what the best treatment is, but the general principle is that the sooner treatment is given the better the outcome. They will decide between conservative and surgical treatment for the fracture. Usually conservative is chosen in low-risk fractures in those whose livelihood does not depend on getting better immediately. However, if an individual has a fracture in a high-risk site or their livelihood depends upon being active (ie a highly competitive athlete or a laborer on their feet all day) then it may be decided that surgery is the best option.

Conservative treatment usually consists of:

  • Pain control with medications
  • A splint that stops weight bearing on the fractured site
  • A reduction in activity until the fracture has healed
  • A slow and gradual increased in activities once the patient is pain-free
  • Exercises to help with rehab

 

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Important Signs You Need to See an Orthopedic Doctor

By  admin6  published  June 19, 2018

Are you suffering from stubborn joint pain that just doesn’t go away? Has your back been hurting for some time? Millions of people in the United States suffer from musculoskeletal problems every year, and they come from a wide variety of sources: overuse, strains, sprains, and simple back, knee, and shoulder pain.

Many people resort to painkilling medication to relieve pain but that is only a temporary solution. It also carries the risk of tolerance and dependence. It is always better to see an orthopedic doctor or surgeon to overcome your pain and discomfort entirely.

Orthopedic surgeons treat the problems arising from the musculoskeletal system. Here are some common signs that you need orthopedic treatment –

  • Stubborn or chronic pain in the muscles, joints or tendons, that persists for more than a few days
  • Deformity in joints
  • Any signs of infection in the joints, such as inflammation, swelling, redness, heat
  • Difficulty in carrying out activities of daily living
  • Joint pain persists even while resting
  • Swelling or bruising around a joint or injury
  • Restricted range of motion

There is a common myth involved with orthopedic treatment. Many people think that orthopedic doctors or surgeons only use surgery to treat orthopedic problems. This is not true. Surgery is always the last resort if medication, physical therapy and minimally invasive procedures fail to provide relief and restore motion and function in the affected part of the body.

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5 Common Knee Injuries and Treatments

By  admin6  published  May 14, 2018

The knee joint may suffer damage during almost any activity, even sitting down. Here’s what you need to know about the five most common knee injuries, and their treatment.

Meniscal Tears

The meniscus is a thin cartilage rim that cushions the knee joint. The meniscus may become torn or ruptured in an athletic or other injury, causing pain, swelling, tenderness, and a limited range of motion.

Meniscus tears do not often heal by themselves but respond quite well to physical therapy and other conservative treatments. Arthroscopic surgery may be necessary in the most severe tears.

ACL Injuries

The ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) is one of the four important ligaments that stabilize the knee. The ACL may get torn due to a sudden shift of force or direction, as in sports injuries. A partial or complete tear causes pain, swelling, instability in the knee, and, a popping sound in the knee.

While partial tears in less active patients can be treated conservatively, active patients who suffer from partial or complete tears need arthroscopic surgery to regain knee joint function.

Fractures

Three bones – the thigh bone, the shin bone and the kneecap – together make up the knee. Any of these bones can break during a fall, a car accident, or indirect trauma. A fractured bone can cause heavy pain, severe swelling, and difficulty walking.

Stable fractures can heal by themselves within several weeks or months once set in a cast. But displaced fractures require surgery to reset the bones. In both cases, recovery requires an extensive physical therapy program to strengthen the joint and regain the full range of motion.

Dislocations

The kneecap or patella may become dislodged from the groove at the bottom of the femur. This is referred to as dislocation and can be caused as a result of an acute or chronic injury. It causes severe pain and swelling and restricted motion.

Many patellar dislocations can be stabilized with rest and bracing but a repeatedly dislocated kneecap may require surgery.

Tendon Tears

The patellar tendon is the tissue responsible for connecting the thigh muscles to the patella. It allows you to flex and straighten your knee. It may become ruptured due to a sudden, strong force, and tear upon a fall or an awkward landing.

Partial tears can be treated conservatively with a brace and physical therapy. But a full tear will require surgery.

Both athletes and non-athletes can suffer from a knee injury. If you’re suffering from acute or chronic knee pain, it’s time to consult an experienced orthopedic surgeon to help you recover completely.

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How Can Knee Arthroscopy Help?

By  admin6  published  April 23, 2018

Minimally invasive knee arthroscopic surgery has proven beneficial for patients with knee problems where surgery is recommended. Since arthroscopy requires smaller incisions, it doesn’t cause much damage to the surrounding soft tissues, reduces blood loss, decreases hospital stay and risk of complications. All these factors make recovery quicker and complete.

Clinical scenarios, in which arthroscopic surgery may be suitable, include –

  • known or suspected septic arthritis
  • Symptomatic meniscal tears that have been treated with non-operative treatment, without relief
  • Symptomatic loose bodies
  • Locked or locking knees
  • Meniscal tears that require repair
  • Inflammatory arthropathy requiring synovectomy
  • Synovial pathology requiring biopsy or resection
  • Unstable chondral pathology causing mechanical symptoms
  • As an adjunct to, and in combination with, other surgical procedures as appropriate for osteoarthritis: for example, high tibial osteotomy and patellofemoral realignment
  • As a diagnostic tool when the condition of the knee or the problem is unclear on MRI or MRI is not possible, and the symptoms are not of osteoarthritis

When osteoarthritis is present, the decision for arthroscopic surgery is made by the treating orthopedic surgeon –

  • after a thorough review and assessment of the arthroscopically treatable pathology, contribution of the osteoarthritis, and the patient’s symptoms
  • only after all conservative and minimally invasive treatment options have been utilized but failed to provide relief and restoration of function
  • after a thorough discussion with the patient about the advantages of the arthroscopic procedure as opposed to continuing non-invasive treatment
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