Category Archives: Shoulder Treatment

Common Golfing Injuries

By  aenriquez  published  November 8, 2019

The game of golf has a reputation for being slow, deliberately careful and so non-violent. But many injuries occur when playing golf. Generally, these are repetitive use injuries that occur by repeating the same motion over and over until wear and tear gradually result in some type of injury.

 

Here is a list of three common injuries that golfers sustain playing the grand old game and some reasons that they occur.

 

  • Rotator cuff tear
  • Golfer’s elbow
  • Hook of hamate fracture

 

Golfer’s elbow is not restricted to golfers and maybe more commonly known as tennis elbow

Rotator Cuff Tear

 

The rotator cuff is the name given to a group of muscles and tendons that support the shoulder, basically holding the joint into place. The reason this is necessary is that the socket of the shoulder joint is not an all-encompassing structure; it is a shallow dish-shaped bone that has evolved because the shoulder is given a wide range of motion. The knee or the elbow (and many other joints) bend in only one direction, while the shoulder is relatively freewheeling owing to the structure of the joint.

 

A rotator cuff tear can be debilitating, causing severe pain when you try to lift your arm, especially if you try to lift your arm above your head. That is where the problem begins. A rotator cuff tear, it follows, mostly afflicts people who work repetitively above their heads, such as painters, sheet-rock installers, or carpenters. It is also common among baseball players, tennis players and swimmers.

 

Treatment

 

Once diagnosed, treatment usually starts with rest, putting ice or heat compresses on the shoulder and physical therapy designed to stretch the tendons and get them to relax. More involved treatment includes injections to help mitigate pain.

 

There are also a variety of surgical options for severe rotator cuff injuries, including arthroscopic tendon repair and open tendon repair, which is more invasive, requiring a longer surgical opening.

 

Golfer’s Elbow

 

Golfer’s elbow is not restricted to golfers and maybe more commonly known as tennis elbow. But it’s not restricted to just golfers and tennis players. It is associated with any activity that includes repeated striking of something by extending your forearm. As such, you can develop tennis elbow while roofing a house, as the many hammering motions can bring on this condition.

 

Golfer’s elbow is an affliction of a tendon but is mostly felt on the bony protrusion of your elbow or this area plus the upper portion of your forearm. While the injury is sustained by many relatively mild concussive strikes with the forearm (a golf ball or a tennis ball is not very heavy, after all), it can be very painful once you reach the threshold, and the injury develops.

 

Treatment

Treatment of golfer’s elbow includes taking time off from golf for a while to allow the tendon to heal. Frequently, ice compacts are used to reduce pain.

 

A conveniently placed brace – a band – is often deployed. This is positioned just under the elbow, and it re-positions the tendon, so it no longer sustains impact when you use it. This can be very effective.

 

Also, physical therapy, pain management, and other techniques are used. Rarely does this condition require surgery to correct, in part because it becomes too painful to repeat the motion and forces people to stop the painful activity and to give the area time to heal.

 

Hook of Hamate Fracture

 

The hook of hamate is a bone. It is the carpal bone at the base of the pinky or little finger on the outside portion of your wrist. A fracture of this bone can be defined as a broken wrist.

 

The fracture can develop from a sudden trauma or from repeatedly striking an object, such as a golf ball, with the same motion over and over. The pain can come on suddenly and result in the inability to grip tightly to an object.

 

Treatment

 

Once diagnosed with an X-ray or a CT Scan, a fractured wrist is often treated with a brace or a cast to restrict or stabilize movement. Pain management may also be required when the injury first occurs. Surgery is usually not needed.

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Rotator Cuff Surgery Includes Minimally Invasive Options

By  aenriquez  published  October 22, 2019

A rotator cuff tear is a common injury that occurs from either daily wear and tear of the shoulder or from a sudden trauma that occurs most often from a sports-related injury. The remedy for a rotator cuff tear is to rest the shoulder until it heals, although often surgery is required to repair the tendon or reattach it to the head of the humerus, which is the long bone of the upper arm.

 

The rotator cuff itself is a group of four muscles and tendons that allow for you to lift and rotate your arms. This group of muscles is complex, allowing for a wide range of motion for your arms, which is useful, of course, daily.

The three basic surgical options for rotator cuff repair are open shoulder repair, arthroscopic surgery, and mini-open surgery

Doctors assign two designations for rotator cuff tears. One is a partial tear, which refers to damage to a tendon. The second type is a complete tear. This refers to a tendon that has been torn free of the humerus bone and requires reattachment.

 

Symptoms

 

A rotator cuff tear can be painful, or it can be experienced as weakness in the shoulder with milder discomfort. The general symptoms are:

 

  • Difficulty raising an arm
  • Loss of motion in the shoulder
  • General weakness of the shoulder
  • Mild to severe pain
  • Pain that accompanies specific movement
  • An odd popping sound in your shoulder during movement

 

Treatment

 

Minor rotator cuff tears can be managed with applications of heat or ice to provide pain relief or improved comfort. Also, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, are recommended. Muscle relaxing and pain medications can also be used during the healing process.

 

Fortunately, if surgery is required, there have been advancements in techniques and equipment over the years that allow for minimally invasive surgery to repair rotator cuff tendons. Not only does this allow for outpatient surgery in many cases, it means quicker recovery times. It also means lower costs.

 

Your doctor will recommend a specific surgery depending on several factors. These include the amount of damage to the tendon, the medical history of the patient, and the doctor’s experiences with the various procedures. Other circumstantial factors could also influence this decision, such as the overall health of the patient or time constraints.

 

Three Surgical Options

 

The three basic surgical options for rotator cuff repair are open shoulder repair, arthroscopic surgery, and mini-open surgery.

 

Open Shoulder Surgery

 

Most often performed in a hospital setting, open shoulder surgery includes a surgical incision that allows the surgeon to view the shoulder muscles and tendons directly. This surgery most often requires the surgeon to detach the deltoid shoulder muscle to get a view of the damaged tendon. As such, this is the more invasive of the surgical options.

 

While performing open shoulder surgery, the surgeon will take advantage of the opportunity to also remove any bone spurs that may have formed on the underside of the acromion. This procedure is called an acromioplasty.

 

This option is chosen when the damage to the tendon is significant, including injuries in which the tendon has become detached from the bone. It is also the option chosen if a tendon replacement is required.

 

Arthroscopic Surgery

 

For arthroscopic surgery, the incision is tiny, just large enough to allow the surgeon to use very thin surgical equipment to repair a damaged tendon. Most often, there are two points of entry. At one point, the surgeon inserts a tiny camera into the shoulder, which will be used to guide the surgical procedure, which the doctor views on a monitor. The second entry point allows for the surgical equipment to be inserted into the area.

 

This is usually done on an outpatient basis at a medical clinic or the doctor’s office.

 

Mini-Open Surgery

 

This surgery includes a combination of open shoulder surgery and arthroscopic surgery. The incision is usually about 3-5 cm long. The advantage of mini-open surgery is that as much of the surgical work is done through arthroscopic equipment so that the deltoid muscle does not have to be detached. However, the incision does allow the doctor to directly view what he is doing for parts of the surgery.

 

 

Rehabilitation and Recovery

 

As with any surgery, there is a period of rest and recovery, which is followed by a rehabilitation period in which the patient begins to adapt to new limitations or to regain strength and flexibility on a gradual basis. During early recovery, pain medication may be prescribed, although any use of opioid pain medication must include a discussion with your doctor on the dangers of pain medication addiction.

 

See a doctor

 

Contact a doctor or visit the emergency room in your area quickly if you suspect a bone infection is occurring. With any of the symptoms above, have a doctor check you out to decide on the necessary course of action.

 

In Tempe, call FXRX Orthopaedics & Bracing at 480-449-3979 for an appointment.

 

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4 Common Injuries that require Urgent Orthopedic Care

By  david@ogrelogic.com  published  June 21, 2019

Orthopedic injuries that result in open fractures (fractures that break the skin) should rush to the nearest ER or call 911. But there are other orthopedic injuries that require urgent orthopedic care.

Knee Injuries

The knee is may suffer an injury even during walking. Most knee injuries are the result of a –

  • sudden change in direction (such as pivoting, shifting, jumping), or
  • sudden force (stepping down from a high surface, landing during a jump)

Any knee injury should be taken seriously and be seen by an orthopedic doctor. Common knee injuries include cartilage and ligament tears, sprains and strains.

Shoulder Injuries

Since the shoulder is one of the most mobile joints, it bears great force and rotation every day.  If the soft tissues, such as ligaments and muscles, of the shoulder are overused or overstressed, injuries may occur. Common shoulder injuries are rotator cuff tears, shoulder fractures, shoulder dislocations and injuries to the soft tissues.

Ankle Injuries

The most common ankle injury is a sprain. When the ankle is –

  • over inverted, such that the soles of the feet point inward, or
  • over everted, such that the soles of the feet point outward, or

the ligaments of the ankle joint suffer a sprain. Ankle sprains may vary in severity.

Wrist Injuries

Wrist injuries usually occur while landing on an outstretched arm during a fall. The wrist may suffer a strain that causes pain, swelling, bruising, and even numbness. A wrist fracture can also similar symptoms.

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Tommy John Surgery

By  aenriquez  published  June 12, 2019

When people think of major league baseball pitcher Tommy John, two things might pop into their minds. The first has to do with his baseball career, which was certainly an exemplary and enduring career that included a record (at the time) for a pitcher of 26 seasons in big league baseball. The second thing people associate with Tommy John is the surgery that bears his name.

 

John’s career included participation in three dramatic Worlds Series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the New York Yankees. Twice he was voted as a baseball All-Star. But one statistic from his career has been the focus of speculation for many years, which is John’s pre-operation success on the pitcher’s mound and his post-operation success.

Any surgical procedure needs to be thoroughly discussed with qualified physicians, and elective surgery is not an exemption to that rule

Before And After Surgery

Prior to surgery, which took place in 1974, John had notched 124 victories as a major league pitcher. After taking a year off to recuperate, John returned in 1976 and from then on amassed 164 more wins. As such, the operation not only worked, but it gave rise to speculation that John threw the ball harder after the surgery than before.

 

John’s comeback from surgery was startling in its success and the pitcher’s longevity. And it wasn’t long before parents of healthy young baseball prospects were requesting the operation for their offspring, hoping the elective procedure would turn their child into a major league baseball player.

 

Buyer Beware

 

Any surgical procedure needs to be thoroughly discussed with qualified physicians, and elective surgery is not an exemption to that rule. Certainly, if you could buy a bionic mechanism that could turn your child into a baseball star, people would line up around the block to grab a hold of that slice of the American Dream. Only your physician and yourself can make the call on whether or not to go through with that option. Here, let’s discuss how the procedure works.

 

Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction surgery

 

Recommended if the ulnar collateral ligament is frayed or stretched beyond healing, this reconstruction surgery was first performed on Tommy Johns by Dodgers team physician Frank Jobe. Technically, the procedure is a surgical graft. This entails replacing the damaged ligament with a tendon taken from a donor or from another portion of the patient’s body.

 

Needless to say, if the tendon is taken from the patient’s body, the physician selects one that will not have a major negative impact when removed. The tendons commonly used are the patellar tendon, which comes from a knee joint, or the palmaris tendon, selected from the opposite forearm.

 

The procedure involves drilling holes in the ulna and humerus bones of the elbow, then wrapping the donated tendon through the holes in a figure eight fashion. The ends of the tendon are then anchored in place. At times, the procedure also involves moving the ulnar nerve, which is made necessary if the new scar tissue is likely to push on the nerve causing post-operative pain.

 

Not Just for Pitchers

 

Pitchers are not the only baseball players prone to ulnar collateral ligament distress. The condition, however, is predominantly a baseball-specific injury. For pitchers, the recovery time is more significant for pitchers than for other players.

Meanwhile, the rise in ulnar collateral ligament procedures on youth – elective or not – has been on the rise, prompting Major League Baseball and Little League Baseball to encourage injury prevention pitching by following a program called Pitch Smart.

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Shoulder Replacement Surgery For Younger Patients

By  aenriquez  published  June 4, 2019

Shoulder replacement surgery – called a shoulder arthroplasty – has traditionally been relegated to helping elderly patients who suffer from long-term arthritis that is leading to the deterioration of cartilage and possibly bone structure. However, doctors now see advancements in both material and technique may allow the option to be extended to select younger patients. Let’s see if you are a candidate for this type of operation.

Structure

The shoulder is a ball and socket style joint with a design that is likely not quite what most people imagine. While many envision a ball and socket as a mechanism that includes a socket wrapping almost completely around a ball, the shoulder has a ball that simply rests against a slightly concave structure, held in place by muscles and a series of tendons and ligaments. Picture a round-bottomed cup resting against an almost flat saucer, held there by rubber bands. The saucer doesn’t wrap around the cup, it provides a settling place for it and, under normal conditions, it stays where it is while allowing for a wide range of motions.

There are pros and cons of each procedure, which should be discussed thoroughly with a physician

The joint, however, is not a system in which bone moves against bone. This occurs when debilitating conditions, like arthritis, become advanced. Normally, a shoulder joint includes healthy cartilage that allows for smooth motions.

Conditions Change

Arthritis is a condition marked by painful movement owing to the deterioration of cartilage. This can occur with age, but it can also be accelerated by prolonged athletic activity. As such, some of the more dedicated athletes – because they practice or play a lot – develop arthritis prematurely.

Doctors, however, have traditionally been reluctant to recommend shoulder replacement surgery for someone who is still young. The reasons for this included the expectation that wear and tear of the replacement material, a metal ball and a plastic cup that allows for smooth motion — would eventually wear out, requiring a second operation.

Doctors at the Mayo Clinic now say that carefully selected younger patients could benefit from shoulder replacement surgery. Here are the criteria that doctors should look for when selecting a younger patient for this type of operation:

  • healthy rotator cuff that can hold the new joint in place
  • Healthy socket bone stock (called the glenoid bone)
  • Intact deltoid muscle
  • Persistent pain that does not respond well to conventional treatment
  • A patient motivated to complete physical therapy for post-operative healing and restoration

Discussions

Patients should be aware of the options for a shoulder arthroplasty before selecting the right procedure for them. There are pros and cons of each procedure, which should be discussed thoroughly with a physician.

The options for surgery include a traditional shoulder arthroplasty, a partial shoulder replacement in which just the ball is replaced and a reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

Reverse Arthroplasty

Doctors came to the realization that the ball, which is normally the terminal part of your arm, and the socket, which is on the proximal side, could be reversed. In fact, it is beneficial to reverse the ball and the socket in conditions in which there is a complete rotator cuff tear, which no longer functions well to hold the joint in place.

The gains of a reverse shoulder arthroplasty is better stability when there is little or no functioning soft tissue that can hold the joint together.

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Considering Joint Replacement Surgery? As Your Local AI

By  aenriquez  published  May 31, 2019

Let’s preface this news with the clear understanding that patients undergoing total knee or total hip replacement surgery should consult with their physicians and ask every question they can think to ask. Then ask a few more questions. Then ask a few more.

However, to whom shall your physician go to ask questions? It turns out, the answer to that may well be to a machine. The reason: A new study conducted at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City found that computers plowing through various algorithms could reasonably predict which patients undergoing these two critical operations would benefit from the surgery and which ones would not.

Predicting the outcome is not always easy for man or machine, but there may be better outcomes if the two work together

“Machine learning has the potential to improve clinical decision making and patent care by helping prioritize resources for post-surgical monitoring and informing pre-surgical discussions of likely outcomes,” the study found. In so many words, that means, patients should ask their doctors every question they can think up. Doctors, on the other hand, would do well to consult the Oracle, which is to say, they should turn to their computers to help guide their decisions.

Predicting the outcome is not always easy for man or machine, but there may be better outcomes if the two work together. This should never mean allow the computer to take a decision out of your hands. But algorithms in the study did have reasonable predictions concerning whether or not patients, two years after surgery, were benefiting from the knee or hip replacements.

The study was lengthy and included thousands of patients. The data collected involved 7,239 hip replacement surgeries and 6,480 knee replacement surgeries done between 2007 and 2012. According to a press release, “using data about both physical and mental status of patients before and two years after procedures, the investigators were able to calculate whether a patient achieved an MCID across four patient-reported outcome measure scores.” Those scores included self-reporting assessments of general physical health, general mental health, plus measures for hip health and knee health.

An MCID, meanwhile, is a clinical term for “did it work?” Technically, MCID stands for minimal clinically important differences. So, maybe the better translations would be: “did you even notice that the surgery worked?”

Of course, this may be the type of study that will not cause much excitement in the general public, which includes those too cynical to believe these predictions are possible and those who assumed computers were helping orthopedic surgeons make critical decisions all along. But, the point for physicians is a bit more important, because doctors live so close to the action that any miscalculation in this regard is considered a very bad day at work.

Nobody likes unnecessary surgery, but especially so if predictions of outcomes are made easier or more accurate. “The least valuable health care is that which is not wanted or needed,” said one of the senior authors of the study Catherine MacLean, MD, Ph.D., HSS, Chief Value Medical Officer at the hospital.

“Accurate prediction of whether individual patients will achieve a meaningful improvement after the procedure will greatly assist patients and their physicians in determining the best course of therapy,” MacLean said.

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Reverse Shoulder Replacement Surgery

By  aenriquez  published  November 21, 2018

Reverse shoulder replacement surgery differs from standard replacement because the ball and joint of the shoulder switch places. In essence, the socket rotates on the outer side of the ball. This is a complicated surgery warranted by certain conditions. It provides significant pain relief and helps improve range of motion of the joint, although after surgery there is some limitation.

The main reason for this complex procedure is arthritis but, there are other reasons as well:

  • the rotator cuff tendons are gone or torn.
  • Shoulder remains painful after a routine shoulder replacement
  • Fracture in the proximal humerus (nearest the joint)
  • bone is shattered or splits into pieces
  • tumor in the humerus shaft or the ball of the humerus

In the event of torn or missing rotator cuff tendons, a person is unable to lift the arm enough to be functional. There may or may not be pain but the main reason for replacement is to regain functionality and motion.

There may or may not be pain but the main reason for replacement is to regain functionality and motion

There are instances when the procedure is not advised. Individuals should avoid this procedure if:

  • The socket bone of the shoulder blade (scapula) is too deteriorated that implants cannot be attached with screws or a bone graft is needed before placement can be done
  • ongoing infection in the shoulder
  • previous infection – increases post-operative risk of infection
  • rotator cuff cannot be repaired
  • complex fracture of the shoulder
  • other treatments did not work (meds, rest, etc)

Surgical risks include bleeding, nerve damage, and possible infection. There may be surgical complications such as:

  • humerus or arm portion (the socket) can become dislodged from the ball (the shoulder blade part) and the prosthesis is “dislocated.”
  • infection
  • the arm portion of the prosthesis can make contact with the bone of shoulder blade in certain positions
  • tingling, numbness and weakness with nerve damage
  • Injury to blood vessels
  • scaring
  • conditions, such as blood clots in the legs (deep venous thrombosis)
  • pulmonary embolus
  • heart attacks and strokes
  • drug or anesthetic reactions

After surgery, several doses of antibiotics are given to reduce the risk of infection. Pain medication will help relieve pain. Most patients can eat a solid diet and get out of bed the day after surgery. Discharge to go home is on the second or third day after surgery.

The arm will be in a sling on discharge from the hospital. The surgeon may provide instruction for gentle range of motion exercises to build mobility and endurance. Physical Therapy may also be ordered.

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Arthroscopic Surgery – Going Inside the Body

By  aenriquez  published  October 31, 2018

Arthroscopic surgery uses a tiny camera (arthroscope) to examine, diagnose and repair damaged tissues inside or around joint like the shoulder or knee. A small incision is made into the skin and the arthroscope is inserted into the area being examined. The number of incisions needed is determined by what needs to be done.

Benefits of arthroscopic surgery are smaller incisions and less damage. Some physicians prefer open surgery because the structures are visible to the naked eye. It depends on what needs to be done, the specific condition, and surgeon experience.

 

There are several shoulder conditions that are repaired with arthroscopy. They include:

  • Rotator Cuff tears
  • Shoulder instability – Labral tears
  • Shoulder bursitis
  • Bicep tendonitis
  • Frozen shoulder
  • AC joint arthritis
  • Bone spurs
  • Repair ligaments
  • Remove inflamed tissue or loose cartilage
  • recurrent shoulder dislocation

Less common repairs include nerve release, fracture repair, and cyst removal.

Following surgery, someone should drive you home. Drowsiness may be felt for two or three days following the surgery. Follow post-op guidelines once home.

Guidelines include:

  • wound care- keep the site clean and dry.
  • Pain control – apply ice during the first 24 hours to reduce swelling, take pain medications as prescribed, Do Not drink alcohol
  • return to activity per doctors instructions

Complications of arthroscopy are uncommon but, may include shoulder stiffness and prolonged rehabilitation

Complications of arthroscopy are uncommon but, may include shoulder stiffness and prolonged rehabilitation. There is one rare complication called chondrolysis (damages cartilage) and can lead to frozen shoulder. Other possible complications include:

  • Infection
  • head or neck injury
  • excessive bleeding
  • blood clots
  • damage to blood vessels or nerves.

 

Rehabilitation plays a huge role in regaining use of the of the joint and resuming daily activities. An exercise program should aim at regaining shoulder strength and movement.

With more complicated repair, physical therapy will be ordered so a physical therapist can supervise the exercise program.

Depending on the health condition treated, recovery times vary. A minor repair may only require a sling and a short period of physical therapy. It will take longer to recuperate from a more complicated surgery.  Full recovery could take several months of physical therapy. Healing is a slow process. Surgeons guidelines and a good rehabilitation plan are important for a successful outcome, as well as, personal participation in the healing process.

Due to the fact that shoulder surgery hurts less, patients tend to do more too soon. The area may feel fine but still needs adequate time to completely heal. Too much activity too soon can cause recurrence of the condition or other damage to repaired tissues.

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How to Deal with Emotional Issues During Orthopedic Treatment

By  aenriquez  published  September 29, 2018

Feeling a bit under the weather, during times of physical impairment?  Have you ever wondered if these midday blues will ever go away?  You might be asking yourself, what is the problem with me?  This is all normal during times of physical pain and treatment.

You just had surgery or are going to have a surgical procedure and you feel anxious.  You are nervous if the surgery will be successful or if you will ever feel the same again.  Will you be able to bend the same, walk normally, eliminate the pain and recover in a timely manner?  You have a right to ponder these unanswered questions.

Sometimes people don’t need advice or neurofeedback or a psychological evaluation.  What people need is family and friends to support them through difficulties and to listen while you vent.  It is very helpful to have people you care about understand your valid concerns.

When you face physical challenges and you must undergo a surgical procedure, it can bring about an onset of feeling anxious and potential depressive states.

What can I do about my emotional issues pre and post-surgery? 

It is extremely difficult to relax, but this one is a big solution to your bouts of anxiousness.  The old saying of mind over matter is powerful for the results that follow.  Lay down in a serene environment and visualize something happy.  When our thoughts are eased, our emotions remain calm as well.

It is also very beneficial to exercise self-care.  For example, take a hot bath (if you can), listen to soothing music, watch a Netflix series, read a book, meditate, pray, call a trusted friend, and write in a journal.

It is beyond frustrating when you are physically unable to walk, exercise or take a regular shower.  People internalize their aggravation and lack the coping skills to stabilize their moods and anxiety.

Part of the healing process prior to and after surgery is lovingly taking care of your mind, emotions and feelings, so you do not experience nerve-racking, uncontrollable episodes.  What we think about, we bring about.  We must learn to feed our mind positive words of affirmation and not negative ones, or we will become mentally exhausted.

The last resort would be to put a patient on a low dose of anti-depressant medication if they cannot learn to manage their emotions and become too stressed out.  Having a surgical procedure is very stressful as well and learning to deal with the pain it brings.  It is not easy to find the proper social support that is needed during fearful times. Worry takes over our once sound mind and produces negative side effects such as headaches, stomachaches, low sex drive, acne, decreased immune functioning and even suicidal thoughts.

Our biggest recommendation is to ASK for help and allow others to be there for you and let trained experts provide treatment, that will solve your issues.

FXRX employs the best medical staff to alleviate pain, but we are also here to assist in making sure you are mentally tranquil as well.  If you have questions, please email us or request an appointment https://www.fxrxinc.com/blog.html.

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Who is at Risk for Injuries and what Treatment Options Should I Choose

By  aenriquez  published  September 20, 2018

Accidents happen all the time and people get injured for numerous reasons!  Athletes fall while running, sports stars twist ankles or bash their knees in, the elderly tumble while shuffling in the driveway, kids fall off their bikes and crack an elbow, weapon mishaps occur to anyone not being careful, car accidents demolish organs on impact and freakish wounds are unstoppable.

Injuries are known as physical trauma. Injuries occur when outside forces cause damage to the body, in unexpected, harmful ways.  Injuries can be life-threatening and be the foundation for much-added pain throughout your body.

Who is at risk for injuries and why?

Anyone that plays a sport has an increased risk for potential injuries to any part of their body.  We know that accidents can occur to anyone, anywhere.  Therefore, athletic gear is enforced.  Kids are forced to wear helmets, cups, body armor, elbow and knee pads, as well as chest protectors.

The elderly are specifically at risk of breaking bones, fractures weaken bone areas or sprained wrists due to not having the same agile mobility as they had in their younger years.  Also, osteoporosis is more likely to occur in older adults.  Osteoporosis is defined as a medical condition where your bones are brittle, they become weak due to your body not making new bones fast enough, and this makes people easily prone to fractures.

Everyone is at risk for bodily harm in an unforeseeable accident with a firearm or automobile catastrophe.  You can lower your risks by not drinking and driving, going the speed limit, wearing your seatbelt, not texting and driving, paying attention to the road and do not get distracted from other people in the car.

At FXRS Orthopedics & Bracing, we have a variety of treatment options, depending upon the severity of your injury and pain level.

We offer various knee therapy choices:

Knee Arthroscopy (Knee Scope)

Knee Replacement

Cartilage Regeneration is done through a knee scope – to avoid a knee replacement

Steroid Injections in joints ease and reduce pain

Regenerative Medicine with PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) Therapy (regenerate damaged tissue)

Orthopedic Bracing (used for arthritis, Carpal Tunnel, and fracture stabilization)

Shoulder Therapy Choices:

Rotator Cuff Repair

Shoulder Arthroscopy – known as a shoulder scope

Partial and Total Shoulder Replacement

Arthroscopic Shoulder Labral Repair

Arthroscopic Shoulder Instability Repair

We also offer fracture treatment and bracing for of these types of injuries.

Our trained surgeons will devise a medical plan that is best for your personal situation.  You are not just a number in our practice.  Our doctors listen to your concerns and care about your road to recovery.

If you would like to schedule an appointment – sign up here https://www.fxrxinc.com/.

We will be with you every step of the way, no matter what solution your body needs.  We want you to live pain-free!  If you have questions or concerns – email us at https://www.fxrxinc.com/contact.html.

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