Most Frequents questions that are asked to a knee surgeon

By  admin2  published  October 6, 2015

Have you ever suffered a knee injury? No, no, not the mere cuts and bruises but one which is deep and cannot be treated from the surface. Such injuries can be painful. In fact, most of you won’t be able to take the pain and gobble down painkillers in one go. But, that’s not the solution, right? If your injury is severe, it may lead to complications later on. So, why not go and see and knee surgeon before things get too complicated?

Taking an appointment with a knee surgeon is no big deal. But yes, finding the right one is. You have the internet. Search for the best knee surgeon in your area and shortlist few names. Then you can see their reputation on the web and get an idea how satisfied their patients are. Select the best one and make an appointment.

It is true that when you visit the chamber of the knee surgeon, you will have a lot of things going on in your mind like:

  • Is my condition pretty severe?
  • Will he want to operate?
  • Do I need a knee replacement surgery? And so on.

In the midst of so many things going on in your mind, you may forget some necessary questions like the cost of a knee surgery, its side effects, how long are you going to take the medicines and etc. do one thing. Write them out on a piece of paper. But yes, do not scribble it. Make a proper list like the one given below:

Questions to be asked to the knee surgeon:

  • What is the guarantee that my implant will be successful and it will not move from its position in future?

Yes, there are few real chances of that happening. You doctor, if he is a reputed one, will make sure that it doesn’t. He will be quite experienced enough to make the right cut at the right angle to insert the implant.

  • What will happen if in future the implant becomes loose?

If you have not noticed yet, doctors do not give a 100% guarantee on anything. But, they give their best to minimize the chances of such incidents as the one mentioned above. If you are aware that you have had a knee transplant, you will be careful for the rest of your life. And that much is required to keep the implant steady. Otherwise, you just have no risk if your doctor is an experienced surgeon.

  • What are the chances of getting an infection?

Knee surgical infection

There is almost no chance of getting an infection if you have chosen an experienced knee surgeon. This is because all surgical instruments are sterilized properly and you will be under the effect of antibiotics that prevent infection.

  • Is there any chance of nerve damage?
knee surgeon phoenix

Nerve damage

Yes, you may have heard about something like this. We all have. But the chances are really less if your doctor is experienced and knowledgeable about the whole thing. He will explain everything to you before you take any decision and less you are satisfied, he will continue answering your questions. After all it’s your knee, a very important contributor in your locomotion.

You can easily find an experienced knee surgeon in Phoenix, Arizona. Just take help of the internet and choose the most reputed one among the results. You will be in good hands for sure.

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How To Recover After Knee Arthroscopic

By  admin2  published  May 25, 2015

Knee Surgeons Phoenix AzArthroscopic surgery is a surgical process where the cartilage in the tendons in your joint are reviewed by a surgeon and repaired. The process begins with a small incision around your kneecap through which a small tube is placed. This tube contains a small camera. The camera is used to reach small areas of your joint in search for the affected region. The camera will show images of the inside of your kneecap to the surgeon on the video monitors inside of the operating room. This allows the Arizona orthopedic surgeon to review the inside of your joint in search for the damaged area.

Once the damaged area is located the knee specialist in Phoenix uses a camera for guidance while they make a secondary incision through which miniature surgical tools are inserted and used to fix the problem. The process of arthroscopic surgery offers significantly faster recovery times compared to open surgery and the incision spots are both quite small. Once this process is complete the Arizona orthopedic surgeon is able to stitch up the incision and work with you to create a recovery plan.

This is a surgical process recommended after you have attempted all other nonsurgical treatment options with no success. If you have exercised all nonsurgical options and your knee joint continues to remain in flames or damaged this surgical option may be your only resort. A doctor will review your medical history and evaluate your current medical health prior to recommending a surgeon. This knee specialist Phoenix will speak with you about the process and what will happen before, during, and after. You might have to get blood work and a regular checkup completed by your primary care physician in order to verify your health. You should also make sure that while speaking with the Arizona orthopedic surgeon you discuss any medications or herbal supplements that you are currently taking. In some cases you may be asked to stop taking these items two weeks before the surgery takes place.

What happens before the surgery?

Before the surgery takes place the hospital will contact you to speak with you about what is expected in terms of your arrival time, what items you should wear, and what items you should and should not drink and eat. All advice offered must be followed. Should you have any questions the hospital staff will be able to answer them.

A local nerve inhibitor will be applied to your knee joint in order to inhibit the nerves in the region which send pain signals to your brain. The area will become numb but you will still be awake. If you prefer to not be awake during the process you can opt for general anesthesia in addition to the local inhibitor. If you have both forms of anesthesia you will help offset the amount of pain that you feel after the surgical procedure is complete.

Your orthopedic surgeon in Phoenix AZ will likely give you a plan for physical therapy. It is imperative that these recommendations be followed as they will help you to retain flexibility and improve strength in the joint.

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Do I Need Shoulder Replacement?

By  admin2  published  October 24, 2014

Many types of shoulder injuries are treated by noninvasive means. However, with some cases of severe arthritis, the damage to the joint is so extensive that a complete surgical replacement becomes necessary. Over the course of treatment, you and your doctor will need to be able to determine when that time has come.

Symptoms of severe arthritis: Pain and stiffness are the main indicators of damage. In the shoulder, like with other joints, this eventually causes severe limitation of range of motion. There can also be a feeling of grinding or catching as the tip of the humerus—the ball in the joint socket—moves around.

Top Orthopedic Surgeons In Phoenix

Tests that might be done: X -rays are commonly done to start evaluating the level of damage. Especially if there’s a record of past testing, this will give a sense of changes or abnormalities in the bone and cartilage. Doctors will have patients perform certain activities to check for strength and range of motion.

Activity modification/interference: One main determination in what level of treatment the Shoulder doctor Phoenixpatient needs is how badly the pain and stiffness are interfering with everyday activities. This can depend partly on the patient’s lifestyle—for example, someone working a job with lots of lifting and carrying might be more affected at a lower level of pain.

In some cases, activity or lifestyle modification can help to mitigate and compensate for pain. However, if attempts to work around the symptoms become impractical or are causing significant problems in the patient’s lifestyle, it is a sign that surgical replacement may be necessary.

Physical therapy progress: For many types of shoulder injuries, this is a preferred form of first-resort treatment. Often, doctors will consider shoulder replacement if the patient is not making expected progress in physical therapy, or if the pain and damage are too severe even for basic exercises.

Upsides to shoulder replacement: Typically, this is effective in helping patients carry out ordinary tasks with significant reduction in pain. Most patients are said to regain about two-thirds of normal shoulder movement. It also prevents further deterioration of the joint.

It is considered to have high potential for effectiveness, with failure rates estimated to be quite low. Stretching exercises and other physical therapy begins about six weeks after surgery, continuing at a higher level around three months after surgery.

The typical lifespan of the replacement parts is long enough that patients older than 60 will typically not need another replacement later on.

Downsides to shoulder replacement: As with other surgeries, there is some risk of infection or difficulty with healing, and some risk from anesthesia. Postoperative infection risk is estimated at around 2 or 3 percent, and is more common in patients who are immunosuppressed from corticosteroids, or who have other ongoing health risks.

Often, shoulder replacement patients will eventually need further surgery, since the artificial joints have an average lifespan of around 10 to 15 years. This makes them a less attractive option for younger patients.

Also, while it does improve on current function, it won’t restore your condition to where it was before there was any damage. There may still be severe stiffness and low range of motion.

Rare potential complications include injury to the nerves or fracture of the upper arm bone, either during or after surgery. Nerve injuries typically improve, however. Slightly more common is dislocation, often from the soft tissue being stretched too far too soon after surgery.

For severe arthritis that hasn’t responded to other forms of treatment, including physical therapy and medication, try consulting with top orthopedic surgeons in Phoenix about what kinds of more extensive treatment might be a good option.

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Common Workplace Injuries

By  admin2  published  October 23, 2014

Depending on what type of industry you’re working in, you may be vulnerable to different types of workplace injuries. Some risks are more common than others, though. In some cases, these injuries lead to patients missing work, or cause varying levels of chronic disability. Along with knowing what to watch out for, knowing what kind of treatment to seek out will limit problems at work and with your health.

Orthopedic Surgeon Phoenix

Backs:Back pain is the most common type of workplace injury, typically from strain and overuse. Improper lifting technique is a known problem, although bad posture in sedentary workers also leads to back injury. These can range from disc herniation to vertebrae or cervical fractures, and strains of either the lower or upper back.

Supportive back braces may help protect from acute overexertion. Rest followed by gradual knee surgeons phoenix az	introduction of physical therapy and behavior or posture adaptation going forward is a preferred treatment.

Shoulders:Shoulder injuries can sometimes result from falls, including in patients who catch themselves and hang by their arms—in falling off the edge of a roof or an open walkway, for example. This can cause labral tears in the cartilage surrounding the joint socket. Other types of sprains, rotator cuff injuries, or pinched nerves can all result from strain or movement when the arm is being held overhead.

In some cases, breaking a fall with your arm can cause fracturing in the shoulder joint. This is indicated by more severe grinding and swelling or deformity. Most types of shoulder fractures will be treated with immobilization, although surgery to install plates or screws will be necessary if fragments have shifted out of place. Severe shoulder separations, from a fall or from lifting, may also require surgery for ligament repair.

Other arm injuries: While falls can also lead to injured elbows and wrists or broken arms, carpal tunnel syndrome is a common injury for workers who spend a lot of time in front of computers. As it becomes more severe, bracing and behavioral adaptation will be required for pain relief and healing.

Knees and legs:Damage to ligaments often comes from acute injuries. The ACL can be strained or torn in landing from a jump or fall, or from a sudden change in direction if you need to dodge something, while other ligaments can be injured from an impact against the knee. Sudden stops or pivots also tear other parts of the knee, such as the meniscus. Other injuries, particularly tendinitis, come from overuse.

While severe knee injuries may need surgical treatment, some can be improved with shorter-term bracing and physical therapy that strengthens the surrounding muscle.

Consulting a doctor as soon as possible after your injury will help you recover more quickly and more completely, and will also help support your worker’s comp claim. An orthopedic surgeon at FXRX can run tests and determine what kind of treatment you might need. They can also help you defend any need to take time of work for recovery.

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How bad is a scapula fracture? A Phoenix Orthopedic Surgeon answers…

By  admin  published  February 17, 2014

In layman’s terms, the scapula is known as the wing bone. There are 2 in the normal human anatomy, and you can feel them on both sides of the upper back. There is a lot of soft tissue and muscle surrounding these bones, therefore, fractures of the scapula are fairly uncommon. Of all the broken bones around the shoulder, scapula fractures only account for about 5%. Typically, the fracture of the scapula is a result of a high-energy trauma such as a car accident. When a scapular fracture is seen, particular suspicion should be given to looking for additional injuries such as a lung injury, rib fractures, or other damage to the arm on the same side. These additional injuries are seen about 90% of the time. It would be unusual for a patient with a scapula fracture not to end up in the emergency room. This is not your typical “I fell on my arm and broke my wrist” scenario where the patient may try and sleep it off and then show up the next day in a doctor’s office. A fall from a building, or a car or motorcycle accident, etc is what is happening here. As mentioned, there are typically significant associated injuries, so a full neurologic and vascular examination is necessary. It may be difficult to do a full examination as typically it is a very painful injury and there is often a rib fracture which may prevent the arm or body from being moved as necessary to do the exam. Plain x-rays after this type of trauma can be very helpful and are necessary to obtain. However, the most important radiographic study is a CAT scan. This can show how much the bone is separated and what kind of an angle there is to the break. Scapular fractures are categorized according to where in the bone the break occurs. It is often determining where the break occurs that then determines if the fracture can be treated without surgery or will need an operation. Typically, a nonoperative approach to scapula fractures is the best method of treatment. If a fracture occurs in the body of the bone, nonsurgical results have been satisfactory. Studies have shown that with long-term follow-up, one fourth of the patients did have some slight disability with either mild pain or range of motion being affected. The area of the scapula that joins up with the shoulder needs to be evaluated carefully as to whether surgery should be performed. This is called the scapular neck. Fractures of this area are very close to the region where the shoulder joint connects with the scapula and there should be a much lower threshold for surgery than otherwise. Indications for surgery in this area of the scapula are poorly defined. Some go by the definition of if the fracture is displaced by over a centimeter or if there is over 40° of an angle to the fracture pieces then surgery should be performed. But this is not a black-and-white area. If you have been involved in a high-energy trauma is best to have a board-certified orthopedic surgeon working on your case. Dr. Sumit Dewanjee of FXRX Inc if the premier practice of orthopedic doctors in Phoenix AZ and also has Orthopedic Surgeons Scottsdale AZ. He specializes in the treatment of knee, shoulder and hip problems such as scapula fractures and other extremity problems. Call today at 480 449-3979 to make your appointment today.

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FXRX Dr. Sumit Dewanjee Discusses Suprascapular Neuropathy

By  admin  published  February 17, 2014

This suprascapular nerve supplies two out of the 4 rotator cuff muscles in the shoulder. These muscles allow individuals to effectively rotate there arm outward and to lift their arm up sideways. This nerve can see an injury in athletes most commonly who participate in repetitive overhead throwing activities. For instance, a baseball pitcher may end up seeing injury to the suprascapular nerve because of the repetitive overhead throwing with extreme ranges of motion. This is called suprascapular neuropathy. The suprascapular nerve is placed in the position of most stress and compression when the arm is lifted sideways and rotated outward. The nerve may become compressed directly from a fluid cyst in the region. Or it may just be that simply the repetitive stress is putting too much traction on the nerve and irritating it. The fluid cyst is not something that develops typically all by itself, it is a side effect of a cartilage injury inside the shoulder known as a labral tear. When an athlete with a super scapular nerve injury is being seen by orthopedic surgeons Phoenix AZ, they report weakening of their shoulder and aching pain which is actually similar in nature to wonder patient has tendinitis of the rotator cuff. When the orthopedic sports medicine surgeon inspects the shoulder it will often reveal atrophy of those 2 muscles supplied by the suprascapular nerve. Those muscles are the suprascapular muscle along with the infraspinatus muscle. An MRI study within our program can show if a fluid system is compressing on the nerve and it can also show if there is a labral tear inside the shoulder most of the time. Along with the MRI, an electrodiagnostic study can confirm the diagnosis and let the physician know the severity of the injury. Suprascapular neuropathy treatment is typically conservative at the beginning. For the most part patients will improve without needing surgery. If however, the individual is having significant atrophy of the rotator cuff muscles and there is a focal compressive elements sitting on the nerve, then surgery may be a good idea to relieve the problem. A shoulder arthroscopy is the most common method of treating the injury. This allows the surgeon to fix the labral tear and let the fluid cyst resolve as a result of that. Going after the compressed nerve directly is by and large not the best idea. The risk profile of that surgery increases substantially and only if it is absolutely necessary should this be performed. FXRX Ince is the premier practice of orthopedic doctors in Phoenix AZ in the state and features Dr. Sumit Dewanjee, a Board Certified, Fellowship Trained Sports Medicine surgeon specializing in the treatment of knee, shoulder and hip problems. Call (480) 449-3979 to make your appointment Today.

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Clavicle Fracture Treatment with an AZ Orthopedic Surgeon

By  admin  published  February 17, 2014

The clavicle is a bone that connects the upper extremity to the torso. It is not a bone with a huge tolerance for deformity, it usually breaks rather than bends under significant stress. The most common way to sustain a fracture of the clavicle is either a direct blow or from falling on an outstretched arm. While it is uncommon for a clavicle fracture to lead to injury to a nerve or blood vessel, there are some close by so with the fracture separates there can be injury to the structures. When a patient sustains a broken clavicle, there is often bruising around the injury and evidence of some bony deformity in the region. Skin abrasions may be present and the shoulder itself is very painful to move. Depending on the energy involved with the trauma, there may be associated injuries to the shoulder girdle or potentially nerves or blood vessels. If there is substantial associated injury, surgery right away may be necessary with a Phoenix orthopedic surgeon. Radiographs will typically show a clavicle fracture very nicely. It would be unnecessary for a patient to need an MRI to make this diagnosis. A CAT scan may help with a skeletally immature patient with an open growth plate or in a situation where there is a fracture dislocation. The majority of clavicle fractures are able to avoid surgery and be treated conservatively. Most fractures occur in the middle 3rd of the bone and healing occurs uneventfully without surgery. About 5% of these fractures do not heal and develop what is called a nonunion. There are also times when a fracture will heal but at an unsatisfactory angle. This is called a malunion. The best indicator of whether or not a patient is going to have future problems is if a broken bone is displaced and bony contact is not present. In addition, research has shown that if the fracture shortens over 2 cm outcomes tend to be worse. Those patients end up with less strength than otherwise. If surgery is necessary for a fracture of the middle 3rd of the clavicle, there are plating techniques available that allow for adequate healing. They do involve a scar obviously and there is also a procedure that involves fixation through the bone which is called intramedullary fixation. This can be accomplished with a screw or a threaded pin. Fractures of the distal 3rd of the clavicle, which is the end of the bone, involve 15% of these fractures. These fractures have various categories depending on how close to the end of the bone they occur and tend to be more complicated than those of the middle third. If the broken bones are displaced from one another, surgery is often a good idea. There is a high propensity for nonunion and residual disability when the bones are displaced and surgery is not performed. Fractures of the medial 3rd of the clavicle, which is the inside part of the bone, are rare. Two to 3% of clavicle fractures are in this region and when they do occur a patient’s airway and large vessel needs to be assessed promptly. Patients who have clavicle fractures should not simply assume surgery is unnecessary. They should seek treatment from an accomplished orthopedic surgeon such as Sumit Dewanjee MD at FXRX. Dr. Dewanjee is a Board Certified, Fellowship Trained orthopedic surgeons phoenix az seeing patients in the greater Phoenix Metropolitan area. Call 480 349-FXRX to make your appointment Today!

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Orthopedic Surgeon Phoenix AZ Discusses ACL Surgery -Yes or No?

By  admin  published  February 17, 2014

Should you have your ACL reconstructed? When a person is in middle-age, such as in his or her 40s or 50s, it is not uncommon to tear the anterior cruciate ligament. This is especially true if the person is participating in athletic activities such as basketball, soccer, or even baseball. If you care your ACL in your 20s or 30s, is not really difficult decision about whether or not to have the ACL reconstruction surgery. But what should you do if your middle-age and you have an ACL tear? It is not always an easy decision. Years ago surgeons used to think that without an intact anterior cruciate ligament the patient would be predisposed to premature arthritis. Numerous studies have now looked at this and have shown patients are not predisposed to arthritis without an ACL reconstruction. So what should be done? If degenerative arthritis is not necessarily going to result from not having the surgery, what should be the deciding factors in the decision process? The 1st is looking at the individuals activity level. If the person participates in those athletic activities such as skiing or soccer, it typically is a good idea to have the ligament reconstructed. The reason is that notwithstanding the risk of arthritis, there is a risk of further injury from having the instability and not being able to perform the twisting and cutting maneuvers necessary in the sporting events. Without having an intact ACL, it can make the knee feel very unstable and give out during athletic activity. The person may then suffer further injury as a result. In making the decision, it would be prudent to seek out an orthopedic sports medicine doctor who has a lot of experience in ACL reconstruction. Dr. Sumit Dewanjee with FXRX has this experience as a Board Certified, Fellowship Trained Sports surgeon specializing in knee, shoulder and hip problems along with fracture treatment and orthopedic bracing. FXRX is the premier practice of knee surgeons in Phoenix in the state and also has the best

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Phoenix Orthopedic Surgeon Describes ACL Reconstruction

By  admin  published  February 17, 2014

The Anterior Cruciate Ligament, known as the ACL for short, is an extremely important piece of anatomy for individuals participating in those sports that require a lot of cutting and twisting activities. These sports include the likes of soccer, gymnastics, baseball, and basketball. Decades ago surgeons tried to suture the torn ligament back together, but that didn’t work because the healing potential is minimal. So the current standard of care involves actually replacing the ACL. There are 2 main options for performing an ACL reconstruction. One includes utilizing a patient’s own tissue which is referred to as an autograft. The 2nd option is referred to as an allograft and this is using tissue from a cadaver. When a patient’s own patellar tendon or hamstring tendon is used, those are autograft options. The same tissue is used in allograft situations if that is the chosen route. Studies have shown that both allograft and autograft options work well in allowing patients to return to high level athletic activities similar to those performed pre-injury. The Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction surgery replaces the ligament in the knee with either tissue from the patient him or herself or tissue from a cadaver. The ACL is a ligament connecting the thighbone to the shinbone and assist patients with the ability to successfully perform twisting activities. The procedure itself is performed by making an incision vertically over the front part of the knee. If the individual’s own patellar tendon is being used as the new anterior cruciate ligament, the initial part procedure involves removing part of this tendon. The tendon itself is partially removed along with bony elements on either and where it comes out of the kneecap as well as from the tibia. This will end up becoming the new ACL. Most of the surgery is then performed through an arthroscopic camera. This is a tiny little camera that fiber optical he allows the surgeon to see inside the knee and the image shows up on the video screen. This allows the surgeon to properly configure the ACL and position it to anatomically replace the one that was torn. While the knee is bent, the damaged ACL is removed and shaved away, and the me is then cleaned of fraying that remains from the injury. The surgeon then inserts a pin in a diagonal manner through the tibia, which is the shinbone, and then through the femur, which is the thigh bone. This pin then becomes a guide for placing the new ACL reconstruction graft. Additional holes are drilled by the surgeon and then the graft is attached to this pin and pulled through and into proper position. Special screws are placed to secure the bony ends of the graft of both the femur and the tibia. The knee is then put through a full range of motion to make sure that there is no impingement. The procedure is then completed. If you have a torn ACL and are wondering whether surgery it is appropriate for you, Dr. Sumit Dewanjee at FXRX is a board certified, fellowship trained orthopedic surgeons Phoenix AZ. FXRX is the premier practice of Phoenix orthopedic surgeons in the state. Dr. Dewanjee specializes in the treatment of knee, shoulder and hip problems including such procedures as < href="">ACL reconstruction surgery. FXRX also specializes in fracture treatment and orthopedic bracing, treating each patient as if he or she were part of their own family! Call (480) 449-3979 to make your appointment TODAY!

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Anterior Shoulder Instability Info – Orthopedic Surgeon FXRX

By  admin  published  February 17, 2014

There are 3 basic types of shoulder instability. These include anterior, posterior, and then there is multidirectional instability. Let’s review in this article Anterior Shoulder Instability.
Anterior instability involves an issue where the shoulder will potentially dislocate out the front. This dislocation or just instability can occur because of repetitive overhead throwing or trauma like a car accident. If a pitcher throws a lot continuously and repetitively it may lead to a slow, gradual soft tissue elongation in the front of the shoulder. As this gets worse, the humeral head may start to displace from the glenoid (the ball coming out of the socket), especially if the rotator cuff muscles get fatigued. It would be unusual to frankly dislocate as a result of this chronic situation without some additional trauma like an athletic collision or fall. The end result of this could be if an athlete is involved in a collision or trauma then a Bankart lesion may take place and one may need orthopedic surgeons phoenix az to surgically repair it. In an overhead thrower such as a pitcher in baseball who is suffering from instability of the anterior type, there’s often symptoms of feelings of looseness of the shoulder when the arm is in the cocked position of throwing. Rather than having frank instability, the pitcher will typically note severe and sudden pain with arm control loss. In addtion, the athlete can experience arm tingling or possibly a dead arm feeling. There are a few different types of physical examination tests to evaluate for anterior instability, which are performed in a controlled setting by a sports medicine doctor to prevent actual dislocation (thankfully). Treatment for anterior instability is treated by Phoenix orthopedic surgeons depending on the instability severity. If the athlete has a lax shoulder from repetitive trauma such as throwing a baseball 95 miles an hour twice a week in games, Phoenix physical therapy can be attempted which will work on strengthening the rotator cuff muscles to prevent the instability and pain. As the therapy moves along, the athlete can start sports participation as long as a successful throwing program is completed with emphasis on proper mechanics. In those who have a traumatic history of anterior instability such as a car accident, there is often a Bankart lesion. This is a situation that occurs after a dislocated shoulder that comes out the front part. As the humeral head dislocates out the front, the glenoid labrum (shoulder cartilage) is damaged and there could also be some bony injury too. This is damage to the ball and socket part of the joint. The labrum is a cartilaginous part that forms a cup where the humorous moves. This allows for stability of the shoulder and a large range of motion. When a shoulder dislocation damages the shoulder, it often does not heal by itself. The actual portion of the labrum which experiences damage is called the inferior glenohumeral ligament. After a patient has sustained a traumatic dislocation with a Bankart lesion, symptoms that the individual may feel include a catching sensations, sense of instability, aching of the shoulder, or unfortunately repeat dislocations. Along with this, the person often says that they simply cannot “trust” their shoulder because they think it may dislocate at any time. When an individual sustains a shoulder dislocation with a labral injury, statistically the chances of re-dislocating are over eightly percent if the person is younger than thirty years. This grows a lot if the person is over age thirty. Along with the physical exam tests looking at shoulder instability, the best test to look at this injury is an MRI. The orthopedic surgeon Phoenix AZ may order the test with contrast injection which may allow better visualization of the injury. Surgery is only for for those individuals who fail considerable nonoperative treatment or who potentially have a history of traumatic shoulder dislocation. In the vast majority of patients no true indication exists to have immediate surgery for this injury type. However, if the injury is a high-level athlete who wants to get back for the next season as a professional, they will need to understand that healing from a labrum repair can take six months or even more. Contemporary arthroscopic shoulder surgery involves reattaching the labrum to the shoulder’s socket. Successful outcomes have been reported in about ninety percent of athletes who are overhead throwing athletes. When it comes to returning to full competition though, the percent of success drop down to 68%.
FXRX is the premier practice of orthopedic surgeons Phoenix AZ in the state and also has Orthopedic Surgeons Mesa AZ. FXRX has Sumit Dewanjee MD who is a Board Certified, Fellowship Trained Sports Medicine surgeon. Call (480) 449-3979 to make your appointment TODAY!

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