Tag Archives: primary care doctor

Parents: Do You Have A First Aid Kit Ready? You Should

By  aenriquez  published  March 2, 2020

It is five in the morning, and you’re sound asleep, dreaming of lambs and butterflies, but a persistent drumming sound is pounding your eardrums. You start to gain consciousness when you realize it’s your child out in the driveway once again practicing layups. Then the drumming stops, and you know he’s just tried a jump shot, and you wait for the ball to crash against the garage. You have an athletic kid. What are you going to do?

You could call the police – just kidding. Or you could open the window and tell him you’re trying to sleep. Or you could assemble a first aid kit because you know someday you’re going to need one. We recommend that this is the choice you make – oh, and make some coffee or buy some earmuffs. You can’t sell your kid. You’re stuck with ’em.

So, here are a few items you should include in that first aid kit, which you probably should make up twice – one for the car, one for the home.

You could go all out and buy an ambulance. But here are a few basics you’ll want to have on hand if your kid is a go-go-go athletic type.

No. 1 A first aid book or, better yet, flashcards. There’s no sense having a first aid kit if you don’t know what you’re doing with it. Get a handy flashcard that lists easy to follow diagrams. This is not the time to stop and read. You want to go to the instructions right away.

A cell phone and phone numbers. Keep a list or upload emergency numbers into your phone, so they are easy to find in an emergency.

An updated list of medical forms, including allergies and current or recently used medications.

Surgical scissors and bandage sheers. Basically, you want a pointy set of scissors and a non-pointy set. The non-pointy set is great for times you don’t want to slip and stab someone, including yourself or your child. But you may find a need for pointy scissors when you have to start sheering in the middle of an article of clothing, for example.

Safety pins. You’ll be surprised how handy everyday necessities like safety pins can be in an emergency.

Forceps and tweezers. Forceps are professional grade tweezers that can clamp and hold position while pinched. Very handy. On the other hand, they tend to be larger than some applications require. Smaller tweezers can be better when trying to extract a small splinter, for example.

Wooden tongue depressors are useful for holding things (including tongues) in place when you don’t want to use your fingers.

Surgical gloves and CPR masks are both very handy when you want to avoid trading germs around. Buy a small pack of sterile gloves.

A flashlight – preferably one that works. Test your flashlight often to make sure that the batteries are up for the job and that the thing works properly.

Travel-ready cold and heat packs that can be used on the road. These packs often work by squeezing the package, which allows for a chemical reaction to produce either a refrigerant or heat.

A blanket and a cell phone. These require no explanation. However, you can shop around for a blanket designed for emergencies. Often these are highly effective and easy to pack.

Elastic bandages, bandage tape and an assortment of Band-Aids. Bandages should include wrapping gauze and various sizes of sterile gauze pads. Include non-stick bandages as well. Also, sterile cotton swabs are handy.

Liquid soap and alcohol pads or a bottle of alcohol are useful for cleaning and sterilizing hands, wounds and equipment.

Aluminum finger splints, eye patches, sterile eyewash, contact lens remover, eye bandages.

Anti-bacterial liquid soap, sunscreen, lip balm, anti-bacterial ointment, topical pain medication for bee stings and the like.

An asthma inhaler if your child has asthma. Often children forget to bring their inhaler and have asthma attacks at inopportune times.

If first aid kits are not very helpful for worse cases, immediately bring the patient to a primary care doctor.

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What is Physical Therapy?

By  aenriquez  published  January 21, 2020

Physical therapy involves the use of a variety of techniques designed to promote healing, reduce pain, or adjust behaviors and skillsets to adapt to a permanent condition that is affecting someone’s life.

Physical therapists deal with a lengthy variety of conditions that range from a sports injury to heart disease. They are the ground-level service providers for healing, conditioning, pain relief, and adaptation to unusual circumstances.

In so many words, your body is designed to heal from illnesses and injuries of all sorts. Your immune system fights off diseases and helps you recover from them. Your muscles and bones, when they are injured, are designed to recover, mending fractures and breaks and growing replacement tissue in many cases. A physical therapist has many techniques that accelerate the healing process. However, if a condition is permanent, like the loss of a limb or spinal cord paralysis, a physical therapist teaches ways to adjust to your disability so you can be as active and pain-free as possible.

You can view healing as one way your body reacts to pain; as such, healing is a process of returning function and to reduce pain. Since physical therapy can promote a speedier recovery, pain relief is an important goal in many physical therapy interventions.

It is impossible to list here all the conditions where a physical therapy strategy can be helpful. They help people learn to walk with a cane or braces; they help people relearn to walk; they help restore movement after a traumatic sports injury; they use a variety of massage techniques to promote deep healing and relaxation; they help women recover after giving birth, and they help people who aren’t injured learn how to do various activities in a safe manner to avoid or prevent an injury in the first place.

Many insurance policies allow people to go directly to a physical therapist – to make an appointment and start working with the PT. Other policies require patients to see a primary care doctor first so that they can make a proper referral to a physical therapist.

Perhaps the best scenario in this situation is to see a doctor in a clinic that already has a physical therapist (or more than one) on staff, so the referral is as good as done.

Goals

 A physical therapist’s goals are always to reduce pain, restore functionality, or prevent injury. Among the first steps in the process are for the physical therapist to measure your current functioning status and assess the level of pain you are suffering.

The physical therapist will then create a customized plan to address your issues. They will then walk you through the plan and teach it to you. Typically, a physical therapist will teach you stretching, relaxation, or exercising activities that you can do at home. They will then schedule a series of appointments with you to monitor your progress and teach new activities to move you to the next level of healing.

Appointments are also helpful for the physical therapist to conduct hands-on healing that is best done in the office, such as extensive massages or measuring your progress. As such, an appointment with a physical therapist often lasts much longer than the standard visit to a doctor’s office. The physical therapist is where the rubber meets the road, where the actual healing from many physical conditions begins. It can take some time for the magic to work. If you are committed to healing, a physical therapist can be a miracle worker.

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